NEAF Public lecture series | Karin Sowada

Dr Karin Sowada | Macquarie University COSMIC TO MICROSCOPIC: HIDDEN SPACES & NEW EVIDENCE FROM THE PYRAMID FIELD AT GIZA New science on archaeological remains from the pyramid workers’ settlement, and the Pyramids themselves, continues to reveal surprising new information about Egypt’s most famous monuments. By harnessing cosmic rays, a new chamber was discovered in …

NEAF Saturday Seminar series | ANCIENT SYRIA – 4

Dr Ross Burns Damascus & Aleppo since the coming of Islam: The development of the city 636 to the present How did the coming of Islam change the nature of the Classical- and Byzantine- era cities? What effect did outside events such as the Mongol invasions, the Crusades or the imposition of rule from empires …

NEAF Saturday Seminar series | ANCIENT SYRIA – 3

Dr Kate da Costa Palmyra, Queen of the Desert From Pompey to Heraclius, Rome controlled Syria for 700 years. The inner well-watered farmlands of Syria proved a vast food and tax bowl for the Empire, supporting some of its largest and most beautiful cities. Syria was both a desert frontier, and a heartland province, birthplace …

NEAF Saturday Seminar series | ANCIENT SYRIA – 2

Dr John Tidmarsh Power and Glory: Syria under the Seleucids In the course of his eleven-year conquest of the Persian empire, Alexander the Great was said to have founded some 70 cities; subsequently his general and founder of the vast Seleucid empire, Seleucus Nicator, settled a further 60 or more. It remains a striking paradox, …

NEAF Saturday Seminar series | ANCIENT SYRIA – 1

Stephen Bourke | University of Sydney From First Cities to Urban Life in the Age of Empires The first large urban centres appear in eastern Syria beyond the Euphrates (the Jezira) in the late 5th Millennium BCE, typified by the 100ha site of Tell Brak, and spread rapidly in the 4th and 3rd Millennia BCE …

Near Eastern Seminar Series (NESS) | Sareeta Zaid 

Sareeta Zaid | The University of Sydney The Indus Valley civilisation: A contextual approach to script The Harappan or Indus Valley script has been a topic of archaeological inquiry from the firstpublication of an Indus stamp seal in 1875. The enigma of the Harappan script, written in an  unknown language with unknown meaning, has intrigued …

Archaeology, Museums, Heritage Seminar

Dr Lusha Guo | Henan University Uncover the Veil of the Secret Color Yue Ware What happens when we take a step back and interrogate photographs of archaeology? Examining the production and use context of archaeological photography can provide us with important cues on how these images can be read. This paper on secret color …

Near Eastern Seminar Series (NESS) | Dr Joseph Lehner 

Dr Joseph Lehner Finance, Trade, and the Metal Craft Economy in Hittite Central Anatolia: Perspective from the Imperial Capital of Hattuša The rise of large-scale states in the Near East has a deep cyclical history. In this paper, which forms the basis of a new monograph project, it examines the rise of states in central …

Philosophy Seminar: Don’t Suffer in Silence: A Self-Help Guide to Self-Blame

Hannah Tierney | Department of Philosophy Don’t Suffer in Silence: A Self-Help Guide to Self-Blame There are better and worse ways to blame others. Likewise, there are better and worse ways to blame yourself. And though there is an ever-expanding literature on the norms that govern our blaming practices, relatively little attention has been paid …

Near Eastern Seminar Series (NESS) | Alison Betts

Professor Alison Betts | The University of Sydney When East and West First Met Up until the 4th millennium BCE, cultural development in China and Central Asia followed individual and distinct trajectories. Apparently, at some time in the early to mid-3rd millennium BCE, Chinese cultural influences began to spread westwards as Eurasian influences drifted eastwards. …